11 Polite Ways to Say “Please Be Advised” in an Email

In the world of professional communication, politeness and courtesy are paramount. One phrase often used to convey information formally is "Please be advised." However, this phrase can sometimes come off as overly formal or even condescending. This article explores 11 polite alternatives to "Please be advised" that you can use in your emails to maintain a respectful and professional tone.

Understanding 'Please Be Advised'

"Please be advised" is a standard phrase in business communication that is typically used to convey important information. It serves as a formal way of saying, "pay attention to this." However, due to its overuse and sometimes impersonal tone, it may not always be the best choice for every situation. Using a different phrase that conveys the same message but in a more personally engaging manner can help your correspondence stand out and be more effective.

Alternatives to "Please be advised" can make your emails sound more personable and less robotic. Here are the different ways to say the same:

  • Kindly note that
  • For your information
  • Please note
  • Just to let you know
  • I would like to inform you
  • Please consider this
  • I wish to notify you
  • It's important to mention that
  • You may find it interesting that
  • I'd like to bring to your attention
  • Please be aware that

Each phrase can be used in different contexts and scenarios, which we'll explore in the next section.

Polite Alternatives in Context

The following table provides examples of how the alternatives to "Please be advised" can be used in different scenarios:

Alternative Phrase Scenario-Based Usage
Kindly note that Kindly note that the meeting has been rescheduled to 10 a.m.
For your information For your information, the deadline for project submissions is next Friday.
Please note Please note, the office will be closed next Monday for the holiday.
Just to let you know Just to let you know, the new software update will be released tomorrow.
I would like to inform you I would like to inform you that we've decided to move forward with your proposal.
Please consider this Please consider this, our company policy has been updated.
I wish to notify you I wish to notify you that your application has been approved.
It's important to mention that It's important to mention that, the client has requested additional changes.
You may find it interesting that You may find it interesting that, our team has just completed a successful project.
I'd like to bring to your attention I'd like to bring to your attention, the budget has been revised.
Please be aware that Please be aware that, the server will be down for maintenance tonight.

Tips for Polite Email Communication

Politeness in email communication is about more than just the words you use. It's also about the tone and context. Here are some tips to consider when crafting your emails:

  • Use a friendly and professional tone. Avoid sounding overly formal or impersonal.
  • Be clear and concise. Avoid unnecessary jargon and lengthy sentences.
  • Use the recipient's name. This creates a more personal connection.

Remember, the golden rule of email communication is to treat others the way you would want to be treated.

Common Mistakes to Avoid

When crafting a professional email, there are a few common mistakes to avoid:

  • Overly formal language: While it's important to maintain a professional tone, being too formal can make your email sound impersonal. It's better to strike a balance between professionalism and approachability.
  • Using jargon or complex phrases: Keep your communication simple and straightforward. Avoid using industry jargon that the recipient may not understand.
  • Not personalizing the email: Using the recipient's name and referencing specific details can make your email seem more personal and less like a mass-produced message.

Real-World Examples

To illustrate how these polite alternatives to "Please be advised" can be used in real-world emails, here are a few examples:

Situation Email
Meeting reschedule Dear Team, Kindly note that our weekly meeting has been rescheduled to Monday at 2 p.m.
Project deadline Hi John, For your information, the deadline for the project submission is next Friday.
Office closure notification Dear Staff, Please note, the office will be closed next Monday for the holiday.
Software update Hi Sarah, Just to let you know, the new software update will be released tomorrow.
Policy update Dear Team, Please consider this, our company policy has been updated.

Wrapping Up with Courtesy

Politeness in professional communication builds respect and fosters a positive work environment. Using varied phrases such as "Kindly note that" or "I wish to notify you" instead of the traditional "Please be advised" can add to the warmth and personability of your emails. So, the next time you're about to type "Please be advised," consider these alternatives to ensure your emails are not only polite, but also engaging and effective.

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